Team Development

Team Development

Today, organizations of all sizes (including emerging, small and mid-size businesses) are redesigning their structures to be more agile and adaptive. To better respond to today’s competitive and fast-pace business landscape, autonomous, flexible networks of teams are replacing traditional hierarchies.
 
Teams are formed to meet a need; they are empowered to take action; and they disband when their work is done. Individuals can serve on multiple teams which may be multi-disciplinary, cross-functional, culturally diverse, virtual ..... and increasingly structured through a mix of contingent or freelancing professionals and employees.
 
Getting the optimal team structure and mix combined with clarity of purpose has never been more important. Leading today's business teams has never been more challenging or critical to achieving business goals. As important for the organization are talented individual contributors who possess the skills to function effectively on the teams to which they belong.
 
While it can be humbling for a leader to ask for help, the payoffs can be huge in terms of leader, team member and organizational success. Call for a consultation so we might learn more about supporting your team to reach its goals. 

“Many of the business issues that we face today within our globalized environment can no longer be solved by a single field of endeavor, let alone a single business leader, manager or employee.” (Gibbs, 2015).

Team Development Goals We Support

AJO has worked with teams in a number of challenging situations. The following scenarios are typical of our work and offer the opportunity for team development /coaching to make a significant impact:
  • A newly formed team defining its role with a new leader at the helm
  • An under-performing team aspiring to achieve much more
  • A leadership team in transformation facing massive market and organizational restructuring
  • Global, virtual and cross functional teams with interaction challenges/barriers
  • A team experiencing debilitating conflict with team members refusing to speak to each other
  • A team who learned they weren’t a team, but a working group